“Too much of Nothing”
A solo show by Robert Brambora

October 16 – 26, 2017
28, rue de Bourgogne -– 75007 Paris

Exhibition view of Too Much of Nothing
Exhibition view of Too Much of Nothing
Exhibition view of Too Much of Nothing
Exhibition view of Too Much of Nothing
Exhibition view of Too Much of Nothing
Robert Brambora, Untitled, 2017
Robert Brambora, Kiss, 2017
Exhibition view of Too Much of Nothing
Robert Brambora, Untitled, 2017
Robert Brambora, Dust, 2017

Sans titre (2016) is proud to present “Too Much of Nothing,” Robert Brambora’s first solo show in Paris.

The link that units Robert Brambora to Sans titre (2016) is as old as our young structure: the artist collaborated with most of our recent expositions while we co–curated alongside him “Switchers: The Air Biennale,” a residency program that ended with a collective exhibition presenting the aesthetic and conceptual collaboration of the invited artists.
For “Too Much of Nothing” the artist invests the new ephemeral address of Sans titre (2016), an ancient hôtel particulier in ruins on rue de Bourgogne (Paris 7th).
He exposes his most recent works that question the pictorial representation of the spirit and express a desire to make ideas, mental images, and dreams all visible.

Inspired by the MRI where the different parts of the brain are revealed in successive layers and function according to the stimulus to which they are subjected, the artist gives the viewer the ability to see the multiplicity of images that structure the thought of an individual and exist in his imagination.

The silhouettes that take the form of a head, in mahogany wood circled by copper, surround the exhibition as so many anonymous brains yet all different.
The texts engraved in the wood contain fragments of scientific studies, newspaper articles, literary citations, excerpts from blogs and dreams described by the artist. Their themes: the housing crisis, overpopulation and the alienation of men in contemporary megalopolises. These texts that interact with paintings reveal an atmosphere, a memory and reflect our ability to understand the abstract.

To accommodate these heads, the artist imagined a minimal and poetic environment that explores the old myth of the artist today, poor and alone. It’s the apartment of a creative type, of a contemporary man, perhaps ours. Filled with his furniture, his objects, his souvenirs, the location becomes a projection of his thoughts, a sort of real life representation of the works from his walls. The visitor asks “Does he still live in this apartment? Did he just leave? Does he occupy the premises legally?”

“He was lying down inside a fish. As he was quite small he could easily fit inside a sea bream or sea bass. The surroundings were beautiful and he had a perfect view. There was a pine grove, olive trees, palm trees. Trees he couldn’t name. One more beautiful than the other .Candles were melting in the sun. It was the kind of view that other people painted. He covered himself with fish bones, as if they were a blanket. The inside of the fish was slimy and warm. Since the fish was still alive, it didn’t really smell. While looking at the sky in the ground in front of him, he desperately tried to fall asleep.”
R.B.